"Fantasia" Is An Early Example of the Ambition Within The Animation Genre | 2 or 3 Things I Know About Film >> Film Film reviews, essays, analysis and more Film | 2 or 3 Things I Know About Film >> Film Film reviews, essays, analysis and more
“Fantasia” Is An Early Example of the Ambition Within The Animation Genre

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One of the most ambitious films ever made, and it still remains one of the most beautiful to watch. In fact, not just to watch. Have you ever tried to fall asleep while watching Fantasia? It’s good for that kind of thing - unless the “Night on Bald Mountain” sequence finds its way into your dreamscape and wakes you up crying to not be turned into dancing demons by Satan himself.

FantasiaCREDIT: SOURCE

Not about the plot, but entirely about being an anthology that is connected by the sincere passion for music. Some of the sequences take part in the magical, slapstick nature of the Disney name - while others simply thrive on the surreal and utilize imagery as a way of interpreting and constructing the types of visuals that can be generated by music. In many of the more interesting moments, the animators manage to cross both together - as in a moment where anthropomorphic mushrooms dance around in colorful unison while a petite one finds himself incapable of keeping up with the choreography. It exists in the same movie as a prehistoric dinosaur sequence that illustrates death as way of all final chapters - and for that, it’s almost mind-blowing that the movie even exists at all. Let alone ending on a spiritually ambiguous moment that thrives on both good and evil in equal proportions.

 

 

FantasiaCREDIT: SOURCE

Not an easy film to necessarily review, but an extremely easy one to get lost in watching time and time again. Fantasia is an example of the ambition in the genre, and the ambition that Walt Disney himself had as a producer. It’s a series of sequences that are all gripping - whether with their imagery or with their music - and hypnotize without much of any expositional sound. That the studio tried again and failed sixty years later to show the same type of craftsmanship that went into making this two-hour experiment a successful reality only highlights more the perfection that this film is.